top of page

BISBEE WIRE #48/Bisbee 1000's bold ask/council agenda & background/ stanky bills at the Lege/more...

editor: fred miller February 19, 2023 #48/February/2023

Hello,


An alert reader pointed out that I made a mistake last issue regarding requirements for construction permits. Owners and contractors applying for a permit do not necessarily have to go to P&Z. As Mark A. pointed out in an email to me, " Applicants for remodels do not have to go to the P&Z Commission unless they are requesting a rezoning or a special use permit to do something not allowed by the current zoning by right. However, any remodels in the Historic District must all go through the DRB." I appreciate the correction.


Read the Observer for the latest on the DRB/Chocolate House. Quite unclear about what happened, but what is clear is that there needs to be some process for when a contractor gets a permt and is into a remodel and finds problems they need to be able to talk with the DRB about changes in the original permit. Perhaps the new regs will solve that. The council on Tuesday will give their final ok on some changes. (see agenda below).


Speaking of the council, they will be asked at the meeting to approve a 5 year contract with Bisbee Vogue in which BV is asking that no permits for the certain areas be given on the third Sat in October. Read the full thing below, but this should be subject to a work session where the public has some input.


And not speaking of the Supes, there is a work session next Thursday to lay out the plan to legally hijack elections. (see below) Go. Talk. Give em a piece of your mind.


And do the same to the legislators through Right to Speak (see below). The stench from some of those proposed laws is difficult to stomach.


I'll be on KBRP radio Friday at 10 in my regular every other Friday segment on the KBRP magazine hosted by Mike Thornton. I'll be talking about...you guessed it! topics in the Wire and other stuff I haven't included. You can stream at kbrpradio.com or listen last by going to the website and clicking archives and click on the show.


f



...............COUNCIL................

REGULAR MEETING TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2023, 7:00 PM 915 S. TOVREAVILLE ROAD


Of Interest:

#1... How your money is being spent

#3.... Read the new reg here. Substantial rewriting. This has been before the council previously and likely will be adopted.

#4,5 ...These are pro-forma items to adhere to state regs. The tax has been approved by voters, it simply raises the 2.5% tax to 3.5% replacing a tax that will sunset in March. So there will be no interruption of revenue to the city. The wrinkle is that half the tax raised will go to the general fund and the other half will go to the street fund.

#6...An interesting proposition. Although I understand the rationale from Bisbee Vogue, I would oppose this simply because there needs to be time for the public to weigh in with their opinion. It basically binds the City for up to two days to allow nothing in OB except the Bisbee 1000 race and set up. BV does not offer any compensation other than usual payments for special event permits and services.

Bisbee Vogue/Bisbee 1000 stair climb is asking the city for a 5 year contract that will forbid the city form granting any special permits that might conflict or interfere with the Bisbee 1000 race. Specifically not permits for Higgins Hill Park; Grassy Park; City Park; andVarious streetsofOld Bisbee used for the Bisbee 1000 Route.Various parking spacesonthe Bisbee 1000 Route to allow for open access to necessary stairways. The contract would also Provide Event Promoter access to the various parks and event locations forty-eight (48) hours before the Bisbee 1000 to deliver and set up necessary equipment and signage for reserved parking the dayofthe event; Setup and erect three (3) tents at Higgins Hill Park forty-eight (48) hours before the Stair Climb event; and Provide Event Promoter with necessary right-of-way use for the Bisbee 1000 Route through Old Bisbee on the dayofthe event.

Read the contract see what you think.

#8...Allows the Request for Proposals (RFP) to go forward. There is no closing date has yet been decided. Of interest is that the Hillcrest building is in an Opportunity Zone and that offers special long term tax considerations for prospective buyers.

#10...Permission to close the Bisbee Pool for the summer season because of costly repairs needed. Upgrades in the electrical system, new pump and motor replacement, and more.


INVOCATION: A Moment of Silence

PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

MAYOR’S PROCLAMATIONS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS:

  • Mayor Budge would like to speak to several bills now before the State Legislature that could cut city revenue and thus cut services that city residents need and enjoy

CALL TO THE PUBLIC

GENERAL BUSINESS:


1. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE: Subject to availability of funds.

2. Approval of the Consent Agenda 1. Approval of the Minutes of the Regular Session of Mayor and Council held on February 21, 2023

2. Approval of a Park, Facility and Right-of-Way Use Permit for Bisbee Pride, Inc. for the use of Goar Park and Adjacent Parking for Day Stage, Amplified Music, entertainers and DJ Area to be held starting Friday, June 16, 2023 through Sunday, June 18, 2023 from 8:00am to 12:00am (Midnight) each day.

3,Approval of an Application for an Extension of Premises/Patio Permit submitted by Electric Brewing for events to be held at 1326 W. Highway 92 #8 Bisbee, Arizona on Saturday, March 18, 2023, Sunday, April 2, 2023, Sunday, June 18, 2023, Sunday August 13, 2023, and Sunday, September 24, 2023; Joseph Fredrickson, Applicant.

4. Approval of a Special Event Liquor License Application Submitted by Friends of Bisbee Animal Shelter for an Event to be held at the Gulch Hotel located at 54 Brewery Avenue for The Prowl on Saturday, March 18, 2023 starting at 12:00pm until Sunday, March 19, 2023 at 2:00am; Kelly Galligan, Applicant.rk


OLD BUSINESS

3. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance O-23-02; Amending and Additions to the Bisbee Zoning Code in relation to Design Review Board “Development Standards for Bisbee, AZ Historic District”.

Nina Williams, Deputy City Clerk


NEW BUSINESS

4. Public Hearing on Increase of the Transaction Privilege Tax from 2.5% to 3.5%.

Keri Bagley, Finance Director


5. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance O-23-01; an Ordinance of the Mayor and City Council, City of Bisbee, County of Cochise, State of Arizona, Increasing the Transaction Privilege Tax form 2.5% to 3.5%.

Keri Bagley, Finance Director


6. Discussion and Possible Approval of a Five-Year Agreement with Bisbee Vogue for Bisbee 1000 Stair Climb.

Stephen Pauken. City Manager

Joe Estes, City Attorney


7. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance O-23-03; Authorizing the Sale and Transfer of Certain Surplus City Property APN: 103-99-034E located on OK Street.

Stephen Pauken, City Manager

8. Discussion and Possible Approval of an amended RFP for the Hillcrest Building.

Stephen Pauken, City Manager

Melissa Hartman, City Planner


9. Discussion and possible approval for reconditioning the Klampress let filter press for the San Jose Wastewater Plant.

Matthew Gurney, Public Works Director


10. Discussion on closing the Bisbee Public Pool for the season due to costly repairs.

Matthew Gurney, Public Works Director


11. City Manager's Report:


COUNCIL COMMENTS OR FUTURE AGENDA ITEM SUGGESTIONS: (Council members may suggest topics for future meeting agendas, but Council will not here discuss, deliberate, or take any action on these topics.):



BISBEE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2023 AT 10:00 AM

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS HEARING ROOM 1415 MELODY LANE, BUILDING G,


COUNTY SUPES AGENDA

Although this is a work session there is so little information as to what they actually want done, it is clear they don't want the public to know. There is no financial impact analysis, no potential impacts on the performance of the Recorder and staff with these proposed extra duties, and certainly no acknowledgement of public criticism of the change. Why not have the administrator take over as interim elections director until there is more time to study the effects of the proposal?Agenda Item #1 Text:Discussion and direction on election integrity and security, election processes, and possible changes we want to pursue in Cochise County.Background:There was much discussion and work in late 2022 on this topic and it was advised that our efforts were being made too close to the election. It is now time to gather and make decisions that effect the security of future elections. This meeting will be a time for: 1. Hearing up to date testimony by local experts on elections and using "machines" in particular, 2. Discussing what actions can be taken by the Board of Supervisors regarding elections and 3. Giving direction to staff to investigate possibilities for accomplishing possible changes/goals desired by the Board.


Proposed Outcome: Creating a more transparent and secure election process through implementing better practices involving possible re-organization of responsible parties, better cyber safety as well as more human participation, such as hand counting. The disenfranchised voters will trust the process and we can truly have a safe and secure election.I urge you to send an email to the Arizona Attorney General’s Election Integrity Unit at EIU@azag.gov with a cc: to A. Fontes the Sec of Sate, and ask them to bring charges against CC supes Crosby and Judd. At the very least a violation of open meeting law when the two conspired to file a lawsuit-as county supes- against then-Elections Director Lisa Marra without any public hearing or vote as mandated by law, and against Crosby for not fullling an oath of office to fully discharge his duties as a supe. (Although ordered by a judge to send the results of the election to the Sec of State, he refused to vote to do so.)


A new reader has put together a timeline of events. Thank you.

TIMELINE OF COCHISE COUNTY ELECTIONS EVENTS 10/24/22 - Judd & Crosby vote to pursue unlawful 100% expanded hand count of ballots, promising no additional cost to taxpayers 10/31/22 - lawsuit opposing hand count filed for which County taxpayers have now paid almost $120,000 Fee for BOS’ attorney, Brian Blehm, ($10,000) paid by unknown source11/9/22Recorder Stevens begins illegal hand count; only stopped by the threat of contempt of court 11/14/22 - Violation of Open Meeting Law (gathering of quorum to conduct county business) 11/14/22 Judd & Crosby file lawsuit against Elections Director Lisa Marra, personally as well as in her official capacity, in an effort to get her to conduct illegal hand count 11/28/22 – Judd & Crosby’s refusal to certify (canvass) election results by last date mandated by AZ law 11/28/22-Two lawsuits—one from SOS office 12/1/22 - Judd finally certifies with Chair English. Crosby does not attend the meeting so never certified 12/2/22letter from State Elections Director Kori Lorick to then-Attorney General Mark Brnovich and County Attorney Brian McIntyre to investigate Crosby and Judd and hold them accountable. 1/24/23-Lisa Marra's resignation, 1/30/23 – follow-up letter from Secretary of State Adrian Fontes to Attorney General Kris Mayes and County Attorney Brian McIntyre to investigate Crosby and Judd. 2/7/23 – County Attorney McIntyre responds to letter from SOS office, expressing willingness to cooperate.

2/14 Recorder David Stevens to assume some or all of Lisa’s responsibilities)


<><>

WALK IN HISTORY

Our ‘Step Back In Time’ historic walking tour starts at the Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum building stairs each Saturday at 2 p.m. There are multiple stops in this 1 hour adventure; each sparks a conversation on topics that range from economics to entertainment, shootouts to Statehood, brewing to bordellos, mining accidents to matrimony, fashion to freight trains, immigration to imagination, and more. This is a walking tour of the Historic District, it does not include Museum admission. $10 adults, $5 kids https://bisbeemuseum.org/walking-tours/?fbclid=IwAR2iqJlH2c-gVM27YU9BSg1pyIJB7kT4mh4cUK-cJGQM3VWWVNYn9s_1qmM


<><><><><>

TALK IN HISTORY

I was doing a bit of research on one of Bisbee's most revered residents, Fred Corrin, when I stumbled on and hour and a half of him talking about his life in Bisbee.you don't want to walk, spend a bit of time listening to more than 300 recordings from Bisbee residents. All available on your favorite device. No charge, but they do accept donations. Go here: https://bisbeemuseum.org/oral-history/page/6/

Corrin, most well known for having the Vista Park tennis courts named after him, was a math teacher at Bisbee High School and later an administrator in the school system. He was a long time promoter of tennis and the BHS girls teams dominated state tennis for 20 years.


<><><><><>

“Rhythms of Bisbee” will be at the Central School theater, March 16, 17 & 18th, 24, 25 and 26th. Producer Rita Verri’s show is a local dance extravaganza featuring, tap, ballet, modern, flamenco , and pole dancing. Performance artists as well as film will also be featured. Tickets can be purchased at the Bisbee book store and on Eventbrite. Preview tickets are available for guest and sponsors only. Tickets at the door will be limited.


<><><><><>

The Copper Queen Library is celebrating the joy of writing by soliciting G-rate limericks for their community showcase. Five lines AABBA is the format. Submit here: http://www.bisbeeaz.gov/2155/Copper-Queen-Library


The readers of the Wire are superb Lord knows they appreciate a good blurb What nobody knows They are dangling their toes As they sit in a chair quite bare



...............THE LEGE................
The Info below comes from a newsletter put out by Melinda Lyer of Citizens Engagement Beyond Voting. Go here for more info and/or to sign up and info on Right to Speak: https://cebv.substack.com/p/cebv-weekly-february-20-2023?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email Republican legislative leaders may not be ready to admit it, but despite their bluster, they know deep down that they are going to have to put ego aside and work with the Democratic governor for the good of our state. The question is not whether that will happen, but when. Spotlight Issue: Good Bills for a Change

After weeks of nonsense, this week’s Appropriations committees bring a refreshing change. We’re highlighting one good bill in each committee: HB2329, which sets up five-year loans to help disadvantaged first-time homebuyers afford a down payment, and SB1544, which would help keep families together by raising the monthly stipend for kinship foster care parents (those related to the child).

Contact the members of House Appropriations on HB2329, and the members of Senate Appropriations on SB1544. Committee information is here.

There are so many bills going through House Appropriations this week that the committee is planning to meet on both Monday and Wednesday. All bills are scheduled for both days. Your RTS bill position will hold for both committees, but comments must be directed to either Monday or Wednesday. If you want to be sure lawmakers see them, copy your comments to both days.

Monday

HB2284, sponsored by David Livingston (R-28), would create state-funded “tent cities” for individuals experiencing homelessness, and bans unhoused people from camping or storing property outside those areas. It would also ban “unauthorized sleeping” on state land, even as rising rents are pushing more people toward that option. Arizona has one of the worst homelessness crises in the nation. This would segregate and criminalize people without addressing the root causes, “a vicious mix of inflation, stagnant wages, limited housing, and skyrocketing rent.” Why not invest in the Housing Trust Fund (HB2256) or prioritize another, better option? Scheduled for House Appropriations Committee, Monday and Wednesday. OPPOSE.

HB2329, sponsored by Marcelino Quiñonez (D-11), would appropriate $12 million from the general fund to create the First Generation Home Buyers Down Payment Assistance Grant Fund. The fund would provide five-year loans for first-time disadvantaged homebuyers to use for down payments. The goal is to help people buy what may be the first home for anyone in their extended family. Scheduled for House Appropriations Committee, Monday and Wednesday. SUPPORT.

HB2338, sponsored by Amish Shah (D-5), would expand Arizona’s Medicaid system to include preventive dental care. This would help maintain overall health and wellness, and save money by helping people avoid serious dental problems. Research shows that gum disease (which is preventable with routine care) may play a role in the development of a number of other conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and respiratory disease. Currently, adults on AHCCCS get only emergency dental care; exams, X-rays, cleanings and other preventive dentistry is not covered. Scheduled for House Appropriations Committee, Monday and Wednesday. SUPPORT.

HB2447, sponsored by Teresa Martinez (R-16), would allow out-of-state residents to buy a vehicle tax-free as long as they first purchase a “special ten-day nonresident registration permit.” The cost on this is highly speculative, around $2.6 million per year. Why should those who can afford to fly here to buy a car get to do so tax-free? Scheduled for House Appropriations Committee, Monday and Wednesday. OPPOSE.

HB2538, sponsored by Beverly Pingerelli (R-28), would allow district and charter schools to offer live, remote instruction for students in grades 9-12 in exchange for a portion of school funding. Schools would get a $500 incentive bonus for each remote student who passes the course. Offering bonuses for passing grades monetizes learning and leads to cherry-picking of students and other forms of inequity. Scheduled for House Appropriations Committee, Monday and Wednesday. OPPOSE.

HB2800, sponsored by Matt Gress (R-4), would give raises to district and charter teachers who teach more than 50% of the day: $5,000 ($400 million) in FY2023-24 and $10,000 ($700 million) in FY2024-25. Though the concept is admirable, the bill is poorly thought out to the point of being unworkable. The lack of flexibility means that, if the coming recession drives the legislature to cut funding to public schools, districts will be forced to lay off teachers (thus increasing class sizes) rather than reduce pay to make ends meet. It leaves out half-time teachers and school support personnel like bus drivers. It ties funds to an "accountability" measure, even though public school funding is already highly accountable and we’re spending hundreds of millions a year on ESA vouchers with zero accountability. And the funds would be subject to the AEL school spending cap. Teacher pay bill HB2779 (Schwiebert, D-2), which was constructed thoughtfully with input from many education experts, was not given a hearing. Scheduled for House Appropriations Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE.

Thursday

SB1544, sponsored by Lela Alston (D-5), would raise the monthly stipend for kinship foster care parents (those related to the child) to the same $600 per month that every other foster parent gets. Kinship foster parents are often grandparents raising grandkids; the bill sponsor, who has been working for parity for these families since 2019, says some families must send the children back to the state because they cannot afford to take care of them. Scheduled for Senate Appropriations Committee, Thursday. SUPPORT.

SB1546, sponsored by Lela Alston (D-5), would set up a $100,000 grant program for district and charter school community gardens. School gardens offer many benefits, including making healthy food more appealing to kids, helping fight hunger, and aiding emotional regulation. Scheduled for Senate Appropriations Committee, Thursday. SUPPORT.

SB1717, sponsored by Steve Kaiser (R-2), would give incentive bonuses to teachers and district and charter schools for students who pass a qualifying dual enrollment course (which allows high school students to earn credit for college classes). Only about half of Arizona schools offer dual enrollment; low-income and rural students have the biggest access gaps. This makes the program just another kind of inequitable "results-based funding" — reinforcing the achievement gap in public schools instead of narrowing it. Scheduled for Senate Appropriations Committee, Thursday. OPPOSE.

SCR1011, sponsored by Steve Kaiser (R-2), would ask voters to allow the Housing Trust Fund to be used to fund state-funded “tent cities” for individuals experiencing homelessness, which would have to be prioritized before any permanent housing solution. Any city with higher homeless rates than the state average would face penalties, encouraging them to simply evict people. It would also ban “unauthorized sleeping” on state land, even as rising rents push more people toward that option. Arizona has one of the worst homelessness crises in the nation. This would segregate and criminalize people without addressing the root causes: “a vicious mix of inflation, stagnant wages, limited housing, and skyrocketing rent.” Why not invest in another, better option? Scheduled for Senate Appropriations Committee, Thursday. OPPOSE.

Bills in Rules Committees

Rules exists only to consider whether a bill is constitutional and in the proper form for passage; the committee doesn’t take testimony and won’t read comments.

These bills will likely proceed to caucus (separate partisan meetings of all Democrats and all Republicans) and from there to a full floor vote, which could happen this week. Bottom line: Treat these as bills that could get a full vote any time. Contact your senator for Senate bills, your representatives for House bills.

SB1040, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would ban trans kids from using the school bathrooms, changing facilities and “sleeping quarters” that align with their gender identities. It would create a situation where trans kids couldn’t use any facilities at all without undue scrutiny of their bodies, calling that a "reasonable accommodation." Anyone who “encounters” a trans person in a bathroom could file suit against public schools. A federal court found that these policies violate the US Constitution and Title IX, so in addition to being monstrously cruel, this would open Arizona to a host of lawsuits at taxpayer expense. Polls show that Americans from every political ideology and age group oppose anti-trans legislation. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1074, sponsored by Sonny Borrelli (R-30), is subject to a striker that would ban all electronic voting equipment from primary use unless it meets Department of Defense cybersecurity standards, all pieces of it are made in the US, and the auditor general is given copies of the source codes. Inspired by a baseless conspiracy theory about (get this) vote-flipping supercomputers. A coalition of federal cybersecurity and election officials called the 2020 presidential election the “most secure in American history.” See duplicate bill HB2613, sponsored by Steve Montenegro (R-29). Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1114, sponsored by Wendy Rogers (R-7), would appropriate $3.64 million to the existing hyperbaric oxygen therapy fund for military veterans, currently comprised of private donations and grants. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is mostly used to treat decompression sickness from scuba diving, but can also be used for serious infections, making it likely this is an attempt at state funding for fraudulent COVID treatment. Last year, lawmakers wrapped an identical bill into the state budget; Ducey used his first line-item veto on it, citing a "lack of public support" (hi, that’s us). Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1140, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would mandate that counties return to precinct-style voting. The voting center model has numerous benefits, including voter convenience, financial savings, and increased turnout. Lawmakers should be making it easier, not harder, for us to vote. See duplicate bill HB2304. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1145, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would exempt students at Arizona’s three in-state universities from student activity fees if the student says the payment would “violate their conscience” or if the student meets any of a list of reasons for exemption, including objecting on religious or moral grounds, financial hardship, and part-time status. Universities already give fee waivers for financial hardship; this is intended to enshrine culture wars into statute. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1146, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would require Arizona’s retirement system to divest from companies that “promote, facilitate or advocate for” abortions for minors, or for “the inclusion of, or the referral of students to, sexually explicit material.” This ill-considered blanket mandate would leave half a million teachers, municipal workers and other government employees with retirement accounts that are unable to invest in most major companies, and creates a minefield for investors and pension fund managers. Hoffman introduced the same bill last year. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1156, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27), would allow people to deduct a maximum of $40,000 in income from their state taxes for adoption, up from $3,000. Adoptive parents are a sympathetic group of people, which is the point. Lawmakers in Arizona have long used incrementalism to advance various harmful policies on school vouchers, reproductive rights, and more. Meanwhile, Arizona already gives away far more in tax loopholes and carve-outs than it spends in its state budget every year. The bill contains no fiscal note to estimate the cost. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1160, sponsored by Christine Marsh (D-4), would keep someone who seeks medical help for another person experiencing a drug-related overdose from being arrested for possession or use of drugs. Research shows the most common reason people don't seek medical help in these situations is fear of arrest, and also that most overdoses are witnessed. Immunizing witnesses from prosecution will reduce this fear and save lives. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. SUPPORT.

SB1213, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27), mandates that the Joint Legislative Audit Committee (JLAC), in addition to the Attorney General and governor, sign off on the Secretary of State’s official elections procedure manual. The manual became politicized when former Attorney General Brnovich, a Republican, unsuccessfully sued former Secretary of State Hobbs, a Democrat, to try to get her to publish a manual more to his liking. Now that both the AG and SoS are Democrats, it’s unlikely anyone will sue. Like the other legislative committees, JLAC membership is stacked, with 7 Republicans and 4 Democrats — making this bill just another transparent attempt to politicize the process. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1239, sponsored by Wendy Rogers (R-7), would allow state agencies to accept cryptocurrency as payment by partnering with a private third-party company. Cryptocurrency is an environmentally destructive bubble that is already popping and a playground for the mega-rich. Even the Wall Street Journal says crypto should be banned, calling it “a gambling contract with a nearly 100% edge for the house.” Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1281, sponsored by Janae Shamp (R-29), is subject to a striker that would mandate state income tax rebates of $200 individual, $400 joint, for tax year 2022. The bill has no fiscal note, but roughly 2.7 million people file income taxes in Arizona every year, so this would likely cost the state a jaw-dropping sum: between $540 million and $1.1 billion. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1300, sponsored by Wendy Rogers (R-7), would prohibit universities and community colleges from banning anyone with a concealed weapons permit — not just students — from possessing, storing, transporting guns on campus. College campuses and guns are a deadly combination, increasing the risks of suicide, homicide and sexual assault. Even our founding fathers believed guns had no place on college campuses. Getting a concealed-weapons permit in Arizona is ridiculously easy. The same bill was also introduced last year. Duplicate bill HB2667, sponsored by Rachel Jones (R-17), is also in committee this week. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1313, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ban cities from making any plans that would “reduce overall system capacity of motor vehicle traffic.” From crashes to climate, from health to finances, our car-centric society is literally killing us. Cities actively working to change this should be commended, not quashed. This bill is based on an absurd conspiracy theory that believes the world government wants to limit people’s freedom of movement and advance a totalitarian agenda. (Yes, really.) Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1314, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ban the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) Transportation Planning Division from adopting a motor vehicle travel mile reduction target or any other demand management policy or project. Demand management is a proactive approach to improve transportation efficiency which doesn’t assume private cars as the best or only solution for urban mobility; its use saves money and makes our cities more livable. Another bill based on an absurd conspiracy theory. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1324, sponsored by Ken Bennett (R-1), would require copies of digital ballot images to be made publicly available online. This was recommended by Cyber Ninjas after their failed ballot review; nearly every question they raised has been found to be misleading, inaccurate, or false. Georgia and some Colorado counties have put ballot images online in an attempt to calm conspiracy theories. But, other than the obvious privacy concerns, this may only generate more mistrust in our democracy. Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer says not all ballots can be made public, so there's no way a random person could replicate the results of an official election count. Part of a continued wave of efforts to restrict and undermine Arizonans’ freedom to vote. See duplicate bill HB2560, sponsored by Ben Toma (R-27). Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1332, sponsored by Janae Shamp (R-29), would make the “cast vote record” (a receipt of everything scanned by a voting machine) a public record. Election deniers have overwhelmed the Maricopa County Elections Department with a deluge of requests for this tedious and routine document, insisting baselessly that it will help detect fraudulent voting patterns. It’s the latest example of the endless, fruitless quest for a smoking gun that has so far yielded no proof of election wrongdoing. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1366, sponsored by Wendy Rogers (R-7), mandates medical personnel to inform women seeking abortions that health benefits may be available to her if she chooses to stay pregnant, that the father of the unborn child is required to provide child support, and that assistance and adoption services are available. They must offer her a list of alternatives to abortion, and tell her that “coercing a woman to undergo an abortion is unlawful.” Bills like this serve no medical purpose, but instead seek to dissuade people from exercising bodily autonomy. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1410, sponsored by Justine Wadsack (R-17), would extend so-called “1487 complaints” to school boards. Passed in 2016, SB1487 allows any state lawmaker to order the Attorney General to investigate whether a city is violating state law. GOP lawmakers have traditionally used 1487 complaints to block cities from enacting policies they disagree with. The same bill was also introduced last year. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1413, sponsored by Justine Wadsack (R-17), would require cities and counties to immediately remove any "homeless encampment" and throw away all materials found there. Homeless people on private property would be charged with trespassing. The bill does not include solutions for housing or shelter. The definition of “homeless encampment” is so broadly written as to criminalize recreational camping. In addition to being blatantly cruel, this bill criminalizes homelessness and has constitutionality issues. The bill was written by the libertarian lobbyist group Goldwater Institute. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1433, sponsored by Justine Wadsack (R-17), would mandate any employer who requires a person be vaccinated for COVID be liable for damages that result from a “significant injury” caused by receiving the vaccine, with a minimum penalty of $1 million. The COVID vaccine is proven to be safe and effective. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1471, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would set up a “man-versus-machine test” of whether humans are better or worse than machines at counting ballots. This would essentially serve as a hand-count audit, measuring accuracy as well as the time and resources required to implement hand counting statewide. Driven by a false belief that machine counting is inherently suspect and susceptible to fraud. Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer is supporting the bill, saying it “will build confidence in our election system by showing that machine tabulation is highly accurate, free of bias, and fast.” Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1500, sponsored by Frank Carroll (R-28), would require state retirement funds to evaluate their investments solely based on finances. Similar to other bills this session that crusade against “pro-abortion, pro-sex-ed” banks. This culture war against an imaginary problem could create real consequences for those who depend on Arizona’s retirement system. An ill-considered blanket mandate such as this could leave half a million teachers, municipal workers and other government employees with retirement accounts that are unable to invest in most major companies, and may create a minefield for investors and pension fund managers. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1518, sponsored by Ken Bennett (R-1), would allow voters to skip the signature verification process by presenting ID when dropping their early ballots off on Election Day. Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer has said that would break the chain of ballot custody, harming election integrity. After the Friday before Election Day, the bill would also ban one person in a family from dropping off the whole family’s early ballots, which could result in more ballots being rejected. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1559, sponsored by Steve Kaiser (R-2), would exempt from state taxes all of the first-year profits for a corporation in its first year of business, half the profits in its second year, and a quarter in its third year. It would also waive all fees. Arizona already gives away far more in tax loopholes and carve-outs than it spends in its state budget every year, while most corporations in Arizona pay only the minimum tax of $50. State revenues are already forecast to crater over the next two years; this is no time to further cut taxes. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1577, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would mandate that, if Arizona has a budget surplus in any given year, the state would have to automatically cut income tax rates by 50% for the following year. Arizona has just begun to dig itself out of the systemic disinvestment of the Great Recession, which left us with a state government underfunded in nearly every area that still struggles to provide the most basic of services. Meanwhile, Arizona still gives away more money every year in tax cuts, credits and carve-outs than it spends in its budget. The budget surplus isn’t evidence that we’re collecting too much revenue; it’s evidence of lawmakers’ persistent unwillingness to invest in our state and its people. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1595, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would make voters present ID in order to drop off their early ballots after 7 PM on the Friday before election day. This would complicate voting for over 1 in 5 voters, resulting in more ballots being rejected. Arizona is a national leader in voting by mail, pioneering the program over 30 years ago. Only about half of Arizona counties even have the capability to tabulate ballots on-site at polling places on Election Day. Voters just refused in November to adopt new ID restrictions for early ballots. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1596, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would require government offices, including school district offices, to serve as polling places if elections officials ask for it. The chaos of Election Day is disruptive to a school’s normal operation and could put students at risk by allowing unverified individuals into a building during school hours. Apparently intended to facilitate a return to precinct-style voting, but Arizona and the nation are already struggling to find enough elections workers. Meanwhile, voting centers offer numerous benefits, including convenience, financial savings and increased turnout. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1597, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would require elections officials to tabulate early ballots on-site at polling places no later than November 2024. Only about half of Arizona counties even have the capability to tabulate ballots on-site at polling places on Election Day. The bill comes with no appropriation for the significant investments that would be required to make this bill reality. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SB1600, sponsored by Janae Shamp (R-29), would broaden a controversial anti-abortion bill from 2017 that requires clinics, hospitals and physicians to “care for a baby delivered alive.” Physicians and parents opposed the 2017 bill for forcing unnecessary procedures on babies with no chance of survival instead of allowing these babies to die in the arms of their parents. The bill removes compromise language inserted to help the bill pass and inserts language related to the concept of fetal personhood. Any violation would be a felony and result in the loss of the medical professional’s license. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SCR1018, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ask voters to amend the Arizona Constitution to ban government from charging anyone based on their vehicle miles traveled or monitoring people’s vehicle miles traveled. Reducing how many miles we drive burns fewer fossil fuels and extends road life, which is good for the state. Based on an absurd conspiracy theory that believes the world government wants to limit people’s freedom of movement and advance a totalitarian agenda. (Yes, really.) Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SCR1023, sponsored by Justine Wadsack (R-17), would ask voters to amend the state Constitution to repeal charter cities in Arizona. Currently larger cities can adopt a charter, which then supersedes any state law that conflicts with purely municipal affairs. State lawmakers have long hated charter cities, passing numerous laws that preempt city regulations on elections, firearms, immigration, smoking, plastic bag use, puppy mills, sugary drinks, water distribution, regulation of dark money, and so much more. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SCR1025, sponsored by Justine Wadsack (R-17), would ask voters to insert the “parents bill of rights” into the state Constitution. This concept, pushed by the extremist Center for Arizona Policy, is often wielded as a far-right political bludgeon against schools, health care organizations and children’s advocacy groups. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SCR1034, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would ask voters to amend the state Constitution to automatically extend the previous year’s state budget if lawmakers don’t pass one in time. This would avoid the threat of a government shutdown if lawmakers couldn’t compromise in time, but would also remove the only real motivation for them to work together and do so. In past years, lawmakers have finished nearly every budget with days or even hours to spare before the start of the next fiscal year. Similar bill HCR2038, sponsored by David Livingston (R-28). Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

SCR1035, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would ask voters to mandate that, if Arizona has a budget surplus in any given year, the state automatically cut income tax rates by 50% for the following year. Arizona has just begun to dig itself out of the Great Recession, which left us with a state government that’s underfunded in nearly every area and still struggles to provide the most basic of services. Meanwhile, Arizona still gives away more money every year in tax cuts, credits and carve-outs than it spends in its budget. The budget surplus isn’t evidence that we’re collecting too much revenue; it’s evidence of lawmakers’ systemic unwillingness to invest in our state and its people. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

...............EVERYTHING ELSE................

From Primatologist Jane Goodall ..."You can’t solve the world’s problems, so don’t try. Instead, focus on what you can do each day to leave this place a little better than you found it... ." https://www.theguardian.com/science/2023/feb/18/jane-goodall-people-are-surprised-i-have-a-wicked-sense-of-humour? <><><><><> This past week in 1970, the 'Chicago Seven' were found not guilty of conspiring to incite riots at the 1968 Democratic national convention. Five were convicted of violating the Anti-riot Act of 1968. Those convictions were later overturned. The seeds of division sprouted during the Vietnam war and this, like the beginning of the civil rights movement, was another seminal event that erupted into view on TV screens reflecting our fragmenting society. <><><><><> CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE RISING COST OF TAMPONS & DIAPERS Climate change is the secret driver of inflation. Consider this Times article. "In the biggest loss on record, Texas farmers abandoned 74 percent of their planted crops — nearly six million acres — because of heat and parched soil, hallmarks of a megadrought made worse by climate change. That crash has helped to push up the price of tampons in the United States 13 percent over the past year. The price of cloth diapers spiked 21 percent. Cotton balls climbed 9 percent and gauze bandages increased by 8 percent. All of that was well above the country’s overall inflation rate of 6.5 percent in 2022" https://www.nytimes.com/2023/02/18/climate/climate-change-cotton-tampons.html?algo=editorial_importance_fy_email_news&block=4&campaign_ <><><><><> TAKE A PICS OF YOUR RENTAL CAR

This is probably the best site to rent a car. Will save you lotsa bucks. And get tips like this....https://www.autoslash.com

We always recommend taking a video of the entire car when you drop it off to protect yourself from false damage claims. We also recommend taking a photo with your cell phone of the dashboard, showing both the mileage and fuel level as you return the car. Also, take a photo of the fuel receipt from your pre-return fillup. Being armed with these proofs is your best protection against getting overcharged.

And there are several good reasons not to prepay gas. Go to the site to find out. <><><><><>

PHOTOS OF LIFE ON EARTH Gotta take a look. https://medium.com/freely-sharing-the-sum-of-all-knowledge/experience-some-of-the-worlds-most-beautiful-places-with-wiki-loves-earth-2022-9e22fa72a3c0 <><><><><> SOCIAL SECURITY TIP Social Security rules have always been very strict about the privacy of someone's records. However you could avoid a lot of hassles and name someone who could be a payee for you. You can do an 'advance designation of representative payee.' If you are a Social Security beneficiary who is still in good mental health, you can contact your Social Security office and name someone you would prefer to be your payee if the need ever arises.Don't rely on power of attorney, it is essentially a meaningless designation for Social Security purposes <><><><><> IN CASE YOU WOULD LIKE TO HIDE OR CHANGE A SCAR, CHECK OUT THESE TATTOOS https://www.boredpanda.com/scars-tattoo-cover-up/ <><><><>

RENEWED AND CANCELLED SHOWS IN 2023 An exhaustive list of what US shows have been renewed or cancelled in 2023 https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/article/renewed-and-cancelled-tv-shows-2023/ <><><><>

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page