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BISBEE WIRE #50/ Supes get Sued!/the lege bans books, body talk, ballots/food news

editor: fred miller March 13, 2023 #50/March 2023

Hello,


Spring seems to have sprung although according to the Almanac, the average last frost date is April 6 for OB. Although not stated it likely is the end of March for Warren and SJ.


A gardener's tip from me to you... if you wear nitrile gloves under work gloves or over your bare hands-perish the thought!, your hands don't get dried out. I use: GLOVEWORKS HD Green Nitrile Industrial Disposable Gloves, 8 Mil,Latex-Free, Raised Diamond Texture, Large, Box of 100 about $23. To order go to amazon.https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LSJRC02?psc=1&smid=A2PN59NP4TJVQ&ref_=chk_typ_imgToDp


It was busy Saturday at the market-74 vendors-and Turkey buzzards a bunch. The Rhythm Revue was kickin it. The chorus sounded good, and lots of peeps in town. For a small burg, lots going on around town, hopefully you can catch some of the action.


fred


...............FOOD................

A FOOD PODCAST WORTH YOUR WHILE

I worked in restaurants for 40 years, never fine dining as this podcast talks about, but most 'white tablecloth dining', with stints flipping burgers and catering. The food world has been such a part of my life that my interest it didn't stop once I retired. It is ever fascinating because it such a basic part of our lives.


The Sporkful is a podcast. (https://www.sporkful.com) for 'eaters' rather than foodies.There are written transcriptions for each show. For those of us who eat-like everybody- and like to talk about it-not everybody-it is an interesting show that focuses on a variety of food related topics; shape of pasta noodles, meat alternatives, the consternation about gas stoves, tamales, firehouse chefs, test kitchens of Consumer Reports, and lots more.


What caught my attention was a show of "Should Fine Dining Exist". https://www.sporkful.com/should-fine-dining-exist/ This particular show focused on the ultra exclusive restaurant Noma in Denmark, often called the best restaurant in the world, and a famous North Carolina restaurant, Chef and the Farmer, that closed. Noma recently announced they would close because it was unsustainable... even at $500 per person. The show goes into the whys and wherefores including a breakdown of what goes into particular dishes and a discussion of unpaid labor that allows some top restaurants to function as they do.

For instance the waiter told a writer that a butterfly made of flowers (a dish of flowers marinated in pollen, shaped to look like a butterfly) took ten to twelve minutes to prepare, and they were making 120 of those a day. That’s more than 22 hours of work every day, to make just one of the many courses served at Noma. Tweezer food.

The chef/owner of that famous N. Carolina restaurant broke down why a particular flatbread would cost $21. It goes way beyond just the ingredients.


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MAIN STREET BISTRO OPENS

Mike Donahue, formerly of Los Hermanos in Warren has opened Main Street Bistro at 105 Tombstone Canyon. He also was part of the restaurant On the Vege at the same location several years ago. The menu will focus on scratch made, organic and local influences. and both vegan and non vegan, offerings.


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TAQUERIA OUTLAWTO OPEN FOR LUNCH

The new restaurant will be opening for lunch in the next week or so.according to owner Mike Clements. He has added a Salsa bar to garnish add to the impressive Taco menu.


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...............BISBEE STUFF................

Photography Walking Tour of Bisbee with Photographer and Historian Boyd Nicholl Saturday, March 18, 2023, 3:30 pm-4:30 pm $15 per person. To purchase your ticket, visit:


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To celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and the joy of writing, the Copper Queen Library is accepting submissions for our Limerick Community Showcase. Patrons of all ages are encouraged to write an original G-rated limerick to be displayed at the CQL.

Patrons can drop off their limerick at the CQL anytime leading up to St. Patrick’s Day, which will be celebrated on Friday, March 17, 2023. Patrons can also submit their limerick online at copperqueenlibrary.com by clicking here.


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BISBEE DANCIN....JAZZ, TAP, BALLET, POLE, FLAMENCO,MODERN, AND LOTS MORE....

The wonderful producer, Rita Verri, is putting on a show! And like her last sold out show, the History of Bisbee through Dance, “Rhythms of Bisbee” features a batch of Bisbeeites shaking, tiptoeing, tap clacking, gyrating, straining, and stretching. It's all at the Central School theater on March 16, 17 & 18th, March 24, 25 and 26th. The show will highlight dance but also feature performance artists, film, and highlight some of Bisbee’s most talented artists.

Tickets can be purchased at the Bisbee book store and on Eventbrite. Preview tickets are available for guest and sponsors only. For more info, including sponsorships, contact Rita at 845-304-0412. Tickets at the door are limited and will carry an extra charge.


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THIS WEEK IN BISBEE

The most complete calendar of events in Bisbee

Or send an email to thisweekinbisbee@gmail.com - to subscribe or send events -


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THE OSCARS SET...

...was digitally designed by Michael Page, owner of Trike Communications. He helped create the designs and digital backdrop for the main stage of the 95th Oscars this past Sunday. This was his 4th collaboration with Allucinari Productions. Michael has designed both the Bisbee Cemtary kiosk and the Warren historial kiosk. Additionally he has been active in a variety of other work around town. https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/oscars95


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GRANTS

The Bisbee Foundation grant cycle ends April 1. Got to bisbeefoundation.com for info and applications.

Also...A real opportunity for students, the Fred Corrin Memorial Scholarship applications are open for current Bisbee High School students. The four year $48,ooo scholarship is for $12,000 per year beginning in the Fall of 2023. The student applicant must remain eligible and in good standing all four years with the institution of their choice.The application, available from counselor Maria Asaro at the Bisbee High School, must be submitted by April 6.

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The Bisbee Woman’s Club is pleased to have Grant awards available of up to $1000 for the 2023 calendar year. These grants are intended for organizations and individuals whose projects benefit the Bisbee Community. The projects will fulfill the mission of the Bisbee Woman’s Club. See www.bisbeewomansclub.com, “About Us” section for more information about our mission. Grant applications will be accepted from February 15 to April 14, 2023. Applications for Grants can be filled out at www.bisbeewomansclub.com/grants. Questions? Call or text Anne Reiniger at 307.690.6625.

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Sparklightinvites schools and organizations serving K-12 students to enter its 5th annual “Dream Bigger” social media campaign for the opportunity to win $2,500 to fund their science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) project or club.

K-12 schools and organizations in communities throughout the 21 states Sparklight serves may enter to win simply by sharing a photo and written entry outlining how the money will be used to fund their technology project – whether for equipment, competition fees, curriculum development, field trips or other materials – and how it benefits students. Six winners will each receive a $2,500 donation. https://www.sparklight.com/charitablegiving <><> Let's Dance - join us for a group dance classic working on West Coast Swing and Salsa. Everyone is welcome. First lesson free. At Club K - text or call Lonnie for details 480 586 5961.

...............THE SUPES................

AZ AG SUES COCHISE COUNTY SUPES!!! (And who will pay for the defense? Taxpayers! Crosby and Judd are legally inept and economically incompetent.) PHOENIX – Attorney General Kris Mayes released the following statement on a lawsuit filed by the Arizona Attorney General's Office against Cochise County: "Today, my office filed a lawsuit against Cochise County, the members of the Cochise County Board of Supervisors, and the County Recorder for their unlawful agreement to delegate nearly all of the Board’s election duties to the Recorder. The Agreement is essentially an unqualified handover from the Board to the Recorder, not one that would allow both entities to work hand in hand to fulfill their statutory duties openly and transparently. While counties may appropriately enter into cooperative agreements with their recorders to manage elections, Cochise County's agreement steps far over the legal line. In addition to this broad transfer of power, I am deeply concerned this move might shield or obscure actions and deliberations the Board would typically conduct publicly under open meeting law. Suing other public officials is not something I take lightly–but it is my job as Attorney General to bring action when public officials unlawfully exercise their power or act outside the confines of their authority." For the full suit go here: https://www.azag.gov/sites/default/files/2023-03/2023-3-7%20Complaint%20and%20Exhibits.pdf To continue a string of poor and ignorant decisions who did the supes hire, with your money, to defend themselves? None other than Tim LaSota who has a horrible track record. He has lost several times …..defending client Abe Hamadeh in Mojave County Superior Court “(Judge) Barr criticized La Sota’s stubbornness, saying in his motion for sanctions that Hamadeh’s attorney clearly knew he didn’t have any proof and still decided to waste the court’s time by going through with the trial. “ Lost…defending client Kari Lake in Maricopa County Superior Court Lost…defending client Kari Lake in Arizona appeals court march 8, 2023 Lost…defending Kari Lake in Records request to Maricopa County Lost…2015 defending Ron AAmes in a lawsuit against city of Peoria As council for AZ Republicans he defended the use of dark money in elections 2016 https://azpbs.org/horizon/2016/07/politics-special/ And while the supes are spending our money Ms. Marra is....A new hire in@AZSecretary's office:@LisaMarra is on board as deputy state elections director, after leaving her elections post in Cochise County.


FLIMFLAM FINCHEM FINAGLED FACTS, FOUND FINANCIAL FAILURE

From the Arizona Mirror...https://www.azmirror.com/

"A trial court judge has said Republican secretary of state nominee Mark Finchem will be forced to pay attorney’s fees in what the judge called a “groundless” lawsuit that aimed to overturn his election loss.

:...His repeated lies, apparent campaign finance violations, and bad-faith legal efforts are a drain on Arizona taxpayers and a stain on our state’s image,” Fontes said. “Anything less than holding Mr. Finchem fully accountable will reward him for his misconduct and embolden others to act similarly in the future.”

The ruling slams the claims brought by Finchem and Cave Creek attorney Daniel McCauley as lacking merit. In her ruling, Julian noted that, while there needs to be a balance on brining sanctions against litigants for election contests as not to cause a “chilling effect” for those who bring proper concerns, Finchem’s case was brought in “bad faith” and McCauley and Finchem likely knew this. " Lest your memory fail you, McCauley has represented the CC supes...and lost also.


...............THE LEGE................

The following is from CEBV weekly, an excellent newsletter. It has been edited. Subscribe or go to their website to read. CEBV Weekly: March 13, 2023 Melinda Merkel Lyer & Cathy Sigmon Civic Engagement Beyond Voting’s website features tons of resources, including a RTS training video that’s 5 minutes well spent.

The bills being heard this week are most decidedly not anything worth celebrating. The razor-thin GOP majority continues to overindulge its most extreme members by advancing hyperpartisan nonsense instead of common-sense solutions. If passed by both chambers, this nonsense will likely meet the brick wall of Gov. Hobbs’ veto stamp — just as “teacher gag bill” SB1305 did this week.

If you have 15 minutes: Act on the Spotlight Bills, below.

⏰⏰ If you have 30 minutes: Use Request to Speak on all bills in committee.

⏰⏰⏰ If you have 45 minutes: Contact your senator and representatives on the bills being heard this week that mean the most to you.

⏰⏰⏰⏰ If you have 60 minutes: Join us on Zoom at 4pm on Sunday for our next CEBV Happy Hour. Our featured speaker is Nebraska state senator Megan Hunt, who is famous for vowing to wage an all-out fight against an abortion ban in her state, including a filibuster if necessary: “We’re going to take every minute possible on this bill and make it as difficult as possible to pass.” Issue 1: Opioid Prescriptions & Public Health

Last Monday, lawmakers in the House Health & Human Services Committee discussed SB1254, which would remove the requirement that prescribed opioids must have a red cap. Ultimately, those lawmakers voted it down. Two Republicans on the committee, Selina Bliss (R-1) and Matt Gress (R-4), mentioned citizen RTS opposition in their vote explanations and said they wished members of the public had appeared to testify.

The red cap was first proposed by those recovering from opioid addiction as a tool to help curb the crisis. Arizona passed the law as part of former Gov. Ducey’s 2018 special session on opioids. The color is meant as a clear warning, like a red flag, that helps patients make more informed decisions about the medication they choose to take. The only concern seems to center around privacy, which is easily addressed with the white paper bag that is customarily provided in nearly all pharmacies.

SB1254 is being heard again this Monday. If you believe a red cap makes a difference, particularly if you have been personally impacted by the opioid epidemic, this committee is asking to hear from you. Reach out to our testimony coordinator Brandy Reese at brandy@cebv.us, and she’ll help you.

Issue 2: New Bills in Request to Speak

This is the first time these bills have appeared in the CEBV Weekly. More information is available below; simply search for the bill numbers. If you RTS on nothing else this week, please weigh in on these. We recommend an OPPOSE stance for each.

  • SB1005 would ban parents from having to pay attorney fees or damages if they lose a lawsuit against a public school or teacher (but not an ESA-funded private school or teacher). The “parents bill of rights,” pushed by the extremist Center for Arizona Policy, is often wielded as a far-right political bludgeon.

  • SB1092 would fine the Bar and the state Supreme Court for “infringing” on “political speech” of lawyers. The bill appears to be intended to address a freshman Arizona lawmaker who is under investigation by the State Bar for filing bad-faith lawsuits over the 2020 election.

  • SB1565 would ban Arizona elections from using artificial intelligence or learning hardware, firmware, or software. Prompted by a belief these tools are being used to mix up signatures and register dead voters; there’s no proof that’s ever happened. Elections officials in Arizona don’t use this technology, making this bill unnecessary.

  • SB1411 would take away rights from people with certain disabilities who receive services by “automatically and immediately” turning their parents into their guardians when they turn 18. The child would get no say in whether this happened; only the parent would have a say, and then only if they opted out at least six months before the child's 18th birthday.

  • HB2460 would claw back a 2021 law that banned the suspension of K-4 students unless they were at least 7 years old or they brought a dangerous weapon or drugs to school. Administrators say the suspension limitations make dealing with behavioral issues difficult, but suspensions aren’t a good way to solve behavioral issues, even for older students. Tuesday SB1145, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would exempt students at Arizona’s three in-state universities from student activity fees if the student says the payment would “violate their conscience” or if the student meets any of a list of reasons for exemption, including objecting on religious or moral grounds, financial hardship, and part-time status. Universities already give fee waivers for financial hardship; this is intended to enshrine culture wars into statute. Scheduled for House Education Committee, Tuesday. OPPOSE. SB1167, sponsored by Steve Kaiser (R-2), would tie length of unemployment relief to Arizona’s unemployment rate. This would disproportionately harm rural areas and people of color, who typically have higher rates of unemployment compared to the state average. Reducing weeks of assistance will force some people to accept jobs that do not match their skill sets and pay less than their prior earnings, which is bad for both workers and the economy. Scheduled for House Commerce Committee, Tuesday. OPPOSE. HB2624, sponsored by Leo Biasiucci (R-30), would force Arizona’s Medicaid system to redetermine the eligibility of all 2.4 million patients it serves by the end of 2023. The legislation would kick off all patients whose eligibility is unconfirmed, not just those determined to be ineligible. AHCCCS already has a plan in place at the direction of the federal government, which is set to be completed at the start of March 2024; an estimated 650,000 Arizonans could lose their health care. If lawmakers force a faster timeline, people with serious conditions could be kicked off their health insurance coverage, leading to the loss of necessary treatment. When pressed, the sponsor called it “not that big of a deal” and said, “I think that they’re going to be fine.” Scheduled for Senate Health & Human Services Committee, Tuesday. OPPOSE. Wednesday SB1005, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would ban parents from having to pay attorney fees or damages if they lose a lawsuit against a public school or teacher (but not an ESA-funded private school or teacher). The sponsor said his bill was necessary because “the (public) school has unlimited resources.” The bill builds on a law passed last year that lets parents sue if they think their parental rights were “usurped.” The “parents bill of rights” concept, pushed by the extremist Center for Arizona Policy, is often wielded as a far-right political bludgeon. Scheduled for House Judiciary Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1009, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would make it a felony to damage or destroy any public or private monument or statue. The movement to remove Confederate monuments has grown since a white supremacist killed nine black people at a South Carolina church in 2015 and since a now-convicted and imprisoned police officer murdered George Floyd in 2020. This is the third straight year Kavanagh has introduced this bill. Damaging a statue simply does not rise to felony magnitude. Passed Senate on party lines 3/1. Scheduled for House Judiciary Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1021, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would require the Attorney General to defend all laws passed by the legislature against all legal challenges, unless 2/3 of the members of both the House and Senate Judiciary Committees vote otherwise. Likely motivated by AG Mayes’ statements on defending the state in recent abortion and ongoing capital funding matters, as well as former AG Brnovich’s refusal to defend Kavanagh’s 2022 law banning filming police within 8 feet (a law which the legislature’s own attorneys told them was unconstitutional). Passed the full Senate 2/21. Scheduled for House Government Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1074, sponsored by Sonny Borrelli (R-30), would ban all electronic voting equipment from primary use unless it meets Department of Defense cybersecurity standards, all pieces of it are made in the US, and the auditor general is given copies of the source codes. Inspired by a baseless conspiracy theory about (get this) vote-flipping supercomputers. A coalition of federal cybersecurity and election officials called the 2020 presidential election the “most secure in American history.” See duplicate bill HB2613, sponsored by Steve Montenegro (R-29). Scheduled for House Municipal Oversight & Elections Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1087, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27), would force state regulatory boards and agencies to waive or reduce license fees if their bank balance hits a certain amount. Spurred on by lobbyists at the Goldwater Institute, Koch-funded Americans for Prosperity, and other large national think tanks, Republican lawmakers routinely sponsor deregulation measures that would harm public safety and state finances. Scheduled for House Regulatory Affairs Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1092, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27), would fine the Bar and the state Supreme Court for “infringing” on “political speech” of lawyers. The bill appears to be intended to aid Arizona lawyer and freshman lawmaker Alex Kolodin (R-3), who is under investigation by the State Bar for filing bad-faith lawsuits over the 2020 election. Attorneys across the country and in Arizona have faced disciplinary action and revocation of their licenses for frivolous claims of election fraud and lawsuits against political rivals. The State Bar and the Arizona Supreme Court both say there’s no problem needing to be fixed. Scheduled for House Judiciary Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1095, sponsored by Frank Carroll (R-28), would require early ballot envelopes to include a written warning that ballots returned via drop box or mailed after the Friday before the election could cause delayed election results. County elections officials oppose the change on the grounds it would cause confusion: for years, voters have been advised to mail their ballots back by the Wednesday before the election. Ballots mailed from rural areas on Friday might not make it to the county recorder’s office by the deadline of 7 PM on Election Day. Held last week, but once again scheduled for House Municipal Oversight & Elections Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1105, sponsored by Frank Carroll (R-28), would require elections officials to immediately tabulate early ballots that are brought to the polls on Election Day, rather than putting them through the signature verification process. Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer says that would break the chain of ballot custody, harming election integrity, and a spokeswoman for the Association of Counties said the bill was “unimplementable.” Scheduled for House Municipal Oversight & Elections Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1146, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would require Arizona’s retirement system to divest from companies that “promote, facilitate or advocate for” abortions for minors, or for “the inclusion of, or the referral of students to, sexually explicit material.” This ill-considered blanket mandate would leave half a million teachers, municipal workers and other government employees with retirement accounts that are unable to invest in most major companies, and creates a minefield for investors and pension fund managers. Hoffman introduced the same bill last year. Scheduled for House Government Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1170, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ban unmonitored drop boxes. These are accessible, convenient, reliable, secure, and hugely popular, yet some lawmakers continue to insist without evidence that they increase election fraud. Scheduled for House Municipal Oversight & Elections Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1243, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would eliminate the "individual" and "switcher" categories for STO (School Tuition Organization) vouchers, roll them into a single category, and increase the maximum contribution amount. This would reduce tracking, make it easier for STOs to take in more money with less administration cost, and circumvent requirements that students attend public schools first. In other words, it's a way to bolster profit. Scheduled for House Ways & Means Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1260, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would accelerate tax cuts on Arizona “small business” income to 2.5% for tax years, starting in 2023. Arizona already gives away far more in tax loopholes and carve-outs than it spends in its state budget every year. Meanwhile, most corporations in Arizona pay only the minimum tax of $50. State revenues are already forecast to crater over the next two years; this is no time to further cut taxes. The bill has no fiscal note to estimate the cost. Scheduled for House Ways & Means Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1428, sponsored by Justine Wadsack (R-17), would ban cities from prohibiting or regulating gun shows within their boundaries. Unregulated gun shows can be a magnet for traffickers to obtain large quantities of weapons without background checks. Guns purchased at gun shows are much more likely to be used in criminal activity. Last year, California became the first state to ban the sale of guns and ammo on state property, which will put an end to gun shows at county fairgrounds. Scheduled for House Judiciary Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1565, sponsored by Frank Carroll (R-28), would ban Arizona elections from using artificial intelligence or learning hardware, firmware, or software. Sen. Sonny Borrelli (R-30) explained in committee that he believes this technology can be used maliciously to mix up signatures and register dead voters; there’s no proof that’s ever happened. Elections officials in Arizona don’t use it, making this bill unnecessary. Scheduled for House Ways & Means Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1596, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would require government offices, including school district offices, to serve as polling places if elections officials ask for it. The chaos of Election Day is disruptive to a school’s normal operation, so the bill would require schools to close. Teachers would be required to attend inservice training and banned from taking a vacation day, presumably to keep them from working the polls. Arizona and the nation are already struggling to find enough elections workers. Scheduled for House Municipal Oversight & Elections Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SB1696, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would double down on a bill passed last year by banning district and charter schools from exposing minors to "sexually explicit materials." The incredibly broad description includes text, audio and video that references sexual contact, sexual excitement, and even physical contact with a person's clothed or unclothed buttocks. This would ban many classic works of literature, from Shakespeare to Maya Angelou. Violations would be a class 5 felony, punishable by up to 2 years in jail. Scheduled for House Government Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. SCR1018, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ask voters to amend the Arizona Constitution to ban government from charging anyone based on their vehicle miles traveled or monitoring people’s vehicle miles traveled. Reducing how many miles we drive burns fewer fossil fuels and extends road life, which is good for the state. Based on an absurd conspiracy theory that believes the “world government” wants to limit people’s freedom of movement and advance a totalitarian agenda. (Yes, really.) Scheduled for House Ways & Means Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. HB2094, sponsored by Kevin Payne (R-21), would relax regulations on food trucks. Payne, who owns a food truck, sponsored the same bill in 2019. Scheduled for Senate Government Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. HB2309, sponsored by Rachel Jones (R-17), would ban Arizona and all its counties and cities from complying with US law if it’s inconsistent with Arizona law regarding the authority of state and local law enforcement agencies. Perhaps some legislators need pocket copies of the US Constitution? Article VI, Paragraph 2, known as the “supremacy clause,” states that the federal constitution and laws take precedence over state ones — not the other way around. Scheduled for Senate Military Affairs, Public Safety & Border Security Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. HB2332, sponsored by Selina Bliss (R-1), would require public district and charter schools to provide students with firearms training between grades 6 and 12. Training would focus on safe handling of firearms, identifying danger signs or careless handling of firearms, and proper storage. Parents or a student's IEP team would be allowed to opt children out. Disturbingly, the bill also allows schools to accept in-kind donations of materials, equipment or services to be used in the trainings from any person or legal entity, with no safety provisions. Some critics have characterized the bill as “an attempt to give the NRA a foothold into classrooms” and to “pull kids into gun culture.” Nearly identical to a bill from last year. Part of a package of bills trying to force guns into schools. Scheduled for Senate Education Committee, Wednesday. OPPOSE. Thursday HB2427, sponsored by Matt Gress (R-4), would lower barriers to filing aggravated assault charges against someone who knowingly attacks a pregnant person and increases mandatory sentencing. This sneaky attempt to codify the concept of fetal personhood harms the rights of anyone who is pregnant. The Arizona Coalition To End Sexual And Domestic Violence opposes the bill. Gress worked with the Center for Arizona Policy, an evangelical Christian lobbyist group trying to outlaw abortion, to craft some of his bills. Scheduled for Senate Judiciary Committee, Thursday. OPPOSE. HB2535, sponsored by Austin Smith (R-29), would exempt wells on private property from municipal regulation if they’re on unincorporated land that is later annexed. Researchers warn that Arizona is rapidly depleting its groundwater, in large part due to lack of regulation, and that “our own survival is at stake.” Scheduled for Senate Natural Resources, Energy & Water Committee, Thursday. OPPOSE. Bills in Rules Committees Rules exists only to consider whether a bill is constitutional and in the proper form for passage; the committee doesn’t take testimony and won’t read comments. These bills will likely proceed to caucus (separate partisan meetings of all Democrats and all Republicans) and from there to a full floor vote, which could happen this week. Bottom line: Treat these as bills that could get a full vote at any time. Contact your senator for Senate bills, your representatives for House bills. SB1011, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would make municipal elections, like mayors and city councils, partisan beginning in 2024. Local government officials are not fixing Republican or Democratic potholes. They should spend their time on local issues, not partisanship. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1013, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would do away with “free speech zones” on college campuses, instead allowing anyone who is “lawfully present” on a university campus to protest anywhere on campus the law permits them to be. This could give rise to protests in classrooms and other protected areas, creating serious safety issues. Influenced by the Goldwater Institute, a wealthy right-wing lobbying firm. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1024, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would ban tents, tarps, boxes or “any full or partial enclosure for habitation” on streets, sidewalks or other public rights of way. In 2019, the Supreme Court refused to hear a case challenging homeless people’s right to sleep on the sidewalk if no other shelter is available. Part of a package of bills from Republican state lawmakers that target people experiencing homelessness. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1028, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27), would classify drag performances as “adult cabaret” (a category historically limited to strip shows) and ban them from public property or anywhere else a minor may be able to see them. As Arizona law contains no definition for drag performances, this could ban everything from drag story hours for kids to performances of Cabaret, Rent and even Peter Pan. A first violation would carry to up to 6 months in jail; a subsequent violation would be a felony. Similar attacks on free expression have been proposed in at least 10 states this year. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1030, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27), would mandate that counties change their zoning laws to define business that hold “drag shows” as adult-oriented, and would also ban the beloved Sunday drag brunch. The goal seems to be to mislead the public, intimidate LGBTQ people by perpetuating false, offensive narratives, and marginalize or force out of business dozens of restaurants and bookstores statewide. Polls show that Americans from every political ideology and age group oppose anti-trans legislation. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1096, sponsored by Frank Carroll (R-28), would ban government and banks from contracting with any company that "discriminates" against weapons manufacturers. The bill seeks to stop the recent trend of banks exercising their right to do business with whom they choose by ending loans to gun companies. Ironically, the bill follows an Arizona Supreme Court ruling proclaiming a constitutional right to refuse to provide custom wedding invitations for same-sex couples. A previous version of this bill was backed by the NRA. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1109, sponsored by Wendy Rogers (R-7), would legalize gun silencers. These are inherently dangerous devices that could confuse the police or the public during a shooting and allow an active shooter to conceal their location. Silencers have been used in serious and deadly crimes over the years, including a mass shooting in 2019 where the gunman used a silencer that one survivor said made his weapon sound like “a nail gun.” The silencer industry has been visiting statehouses around the country and giving demonstrations to state lawmakers to market its products. Passed the full Senate, 2/21. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1141, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would require anyone who turns in an early ballot at the polls to show ID, and if they turn in more than one ballot, to sign an affidavit. Violators would be subject to a class 5 felony. The claim that people dropping off multiple ballots is somehow proof of election fraud is patently false. The only case ever prosecuted in Arizona is a 66-year-old grandmother who collected four ballots in 2020. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1142, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would require publicly posted lists of each event the Secretary of State or a county recorder attends and provides voter registration services. Hoffman said in committee that his intent is to open elections officials to complaints under a 2016 law that allows any state lawmaker to order the Attorney General to investigate whether counties are violating state law. GOP lawmakers have traditionally used these 1487 complaints to block policies they disagree with. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1201, sponsored by John Kavanagh (R-3), would ban signatures on polling place or voting center electronic pollbooks from being used for signature comparisons to verify early ballots. The sponsor explained in committee that he views these signatures as “inherently fraudulent” because they are electronic, even though they come from an official source. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1213, sponsored by Anthony Kern (R-27), mandates that the Joint Legislative Audit Committee (JLAC), in addition to the Attorney General and governor, sign off on the Secretary of State’s official elections procedure manual. The manual became politicized when former Attorney General Brnovich, a Republican, unsuccessfully sued former Secretary of State Hobbs, a Democrat, to try to get her to publish a manual more to his liking. Now that both the AG and SoS are Democrats, it’s unlikely anyone will sue. Like the other legislative committees, JLAC membership is stacked, with 7 Republicans and 4 Democrats — making this bill just another transparent attempt to politicize the process. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1234, sponsored by Wendy Rogers (R-7), would ban the use of photo radar. Numerous studies have found both speed and red-light cameras offer many safety benefits. Conspicuous, fixed cameras reduce traffic crashes and injuries by up to 35 percent. Nobody likes a ticket, but Arizona has had speed cameras since 1987 for good reason. Repealing photo radar will lead to more dangerous roads and more collisions. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1236, sponsored by Wendy Rogers (R-7), would ban cities and counties from charging taxes or fees on blockchain technology. Cryptocurrency is a bubble that is already popping and a playground for the mega-rich. It's incredibly environmentally destructive: each Bitcoin transaction consumes enough electricity to run an American home for 6 weeks. Even the Wall Street Journal says crypto should be banned, calling it “a gambling contract with a nearly 100% edge for the house.”Passed the Senate 2/21. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1312, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ban government from setting goals to reduce vehicle miles of travel. Reducing vehicle miles burns fewer fossil fuels and extends road life, which is good for the state. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1331, sponsored by Janae Shamp (R-29), would ban school governing boards from restricting or prohibiting the parent of a student from carrying or transporting a firearm on school property if the parent possesses a valid concealed weapons permit. Getting a concealed-weapons permit in Arizona is ridiculously easy. Meanwhile, angry parents are disrupting school board meetings and threatening school staff. Do we really want to arm them? Armed members of the public are required to go through a metal detector before entering Arizona’s House of Representatives, and must either leave their weapons in their vehicles or check them with security — a fact which Alexander Kolodin (R-3) acknowledged “does make us look slightly hypocritical.” Part of a package of bills trying to force guns into schools. A federal law, the Gun Free School Zones Act of 1990, protects nearly every school as a gun-free zone. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1411, sponsored by Justine Wadsack (R-17), would take away rights from people with certain disabilities who receive services by “automatically and immediately” turning their parents into their guardians when they turn 18. The child would get no say in whether this happened; only the parent would have a say, and then only if they notified the Department of Economic Security at least six months before the child's 18th birthday. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1564, sponsored by Steve Kaiser (R-2), would mandate that students at small private schools or who use ESA vouchers must be allowed into interscholastic activities at public schools. Athletics should be something parents consider when choosing a school for their student. When parents opt out of local schools, they opt out of their extracurriculars too. ESA vouchers siphon dollars away from local public schools; it is unreasonable to require those schools to also squeeze non-attendees into extracurriculars who made a different choice. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1599, sponsored by JD Mesnard (R-13), would impose penalties of up to $5,000 per day for school districts that don't post teacher salary information as already required by law. Along with being egregiously excessive compared to the nature of the offense, this mandate does not include a requirement to post a comparison to teacher salaries in other states, nor does it apply to taxpayer-funded, private voucher schools. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1600, sponsored by Janae Shamp (R-29), would broaden a controversial anti-abortion bill from 2017 that requires clinics, hospitals and physicians to “care for a baby delivered alive.” Physicians and parents opposed the 2017 bill for forcing unnecessary procedures on babies with no chance of survival instead of allowing these babies to die in the arms of their parents. The bill removes compromise language inserted to help the bill pass and inserts language related to the concept of fetal personhood. Any violation would be a felony and result in the loss of the medical professional’s license. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. SB1695, sponsored by Jake Hoffman (R-15), would ban Maricopa and Pima county supervisors from certifying election results if “election laws were violated and the violations resulted in the disenfranchisement of at least 1% of the eligible voters in the county.” This has not happened a single time in state or national history. In such cases, the county would be forced to hold a new election, and any county supervisor who opposed would lose their seat. This is driven by a ridiculous conspiracy theory (and anger at county supervisors who refuse to buy in) and causing real damage to our democracy. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. HB2308, sponsored by Rachel Jones (R-17), would ban the Secretary of State from overseeing an election in which s/he is a candidate, instead being required to announce a replacement for those duties. This bill is driven by the false conspiracy theory that Katie Hobbs somehow faked her 2022 gubernatorial win through her electoral powers as Secretary of State. That’s just nonsense. In Arizona, as in the majority of states, an elected official is responsible for certifying statewide results, and elected officials routinely certify their own wins and losses. It's also common for elected officials to continue their duties while seeking higher offices. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. HB2394, sponsored by Austin Smith (R-29), bans Arizona and its cities and counties from enforcing any tax on firearms or ammo, on the grounds that it “might create a chilling effect on the purchase or ownership of those items by law-abiding citizens.” The federal government has taxed these items since 1919. It seems some lawmakers need pocket copies of the US Constitution and knowledge of the “supremacy clause”: on February 13, before this bill passed the full House, the legislature’s nonpartisan rules attorneys warned them it’s unconstitutional. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. HB2460, sponsored by Beverly Pingerelli (R-28), would claw back a 2021 law that banned the suspension of K-4 students unless they were at least 7 years old or they brought a dangerous weapon or drugs to school. This bill allows those students to be suspended for up to 2 days at a time for any reason, with a school-year cap on total suspensions for those students at 10 days. Administrators say the suspension limitations make dealing with behavioral issues difficult, but the American Institute for Research found in a 2021 study that suspensions aren’t a good way to solve behavioral issues, even for middle- and high school students. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. HB2472, sponsored by Steve Montenegro (R-29), would ban the state from requiring banks to use a “social credit score” when evaluating loan worthiness. Driven by a panic that society will hold extremists accountable for their actions, the goal is to stop "discrimination" based on political affiliation or social or environmental values. This is absurd: unlike race, religion or gender, political opinion isn’t covered by fair lending laws. Similar to a failed bill from last year. One recent study says such efforts could cost Arizona millions. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. HB2474, sponsored by Steve Montenegro (R-29), would ban immunizations that have received FDA emergency use authorization from being required for school attendance. There are no scientific grounds to justify this bill; in fact, a recent scientific review praises the emergency use authorization process. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. HB2477, sponsored by Steve Montenegro (R-29), affirms the importance of the electoral college system for presidential elections. That system is an artifact that has long outlived its usefulness. It was designed to empower southern slave-owning whites, continues to adversely impact black voters by diluting their political power, and has handed victory to the loser of the popular vote twice in the past two decades, a schism that seriously undermines the legitimacy of our elections. Only 35% of Americans support keeping it. Scheduled for Senate Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE. HB2800, sponsored by Matt Gress (R-4), would give large raises to certain district and charter teachers who teach more than 50% of the day. Though the concept is admirable, the bill is unworkable. The lack of flexibility means that, if the coming recession drives the legislature to cut funding to public schools, districts will be forced to lay off teachers (thus increasing class sizes) rather than reduce pay to make ends meet. It leaves out half-time teachers and school support personnel. It ties funds to an "accountability" measure, even though public school funding is already highly accountable and we’re spending hundreds of millions a year on ESA vouchers with zero accountability. And the funds would be subject to the AEL school spending cap. Teacher pay bill HB2779 (Schwiebert, D-2), which was constructed thoughtfully with input from many education experts, was not given a hearing. Scheduled for House Rules Committee, Monday. OPPOSE.

POLITICS


KNOW YOUR SOURCES: POLLING DATA

Five Thirty Eight, one of the best orgs for pulling together polling data on various political races has established a metric that rates most polling organizations. They use various methods. Important for us lay people is a dashboard that rates the various polling organizations according to those metrics. Know your sources.


...............TECH................

HOW TO STOP BEING TRACKED BY STREAMING DEVICES

If you use a Roku, Apple TV, Google Chromecast or Amazon Fire TV Stick, you should know that these tools can track your activity.

"Every major smart TV streaming platform captures your viewing data. Makers of software and hardware -- from your new streaming stick to your TV itself -- use that data to "improve" the products and services they offer, by tailoring recommendations and the ads they show you, for example."


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HOW TO STOP BEING TRACKED BY YOUR TV


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IPHONE TIPS

Free Storage

I mentioned a bit ago how to offload apps you are not using to free up storage. (Although 50 GB of icloud of storage from Apple is $1 a month) But something else to check out is getting rid of large attachments. These are usually vids, gifs, and photos, Go to Settings > General > iPhone Storage and check which apps are taking up the most storage. In the same screen scroll down a tad and "Review Large Attachments". Get rid of stuff you no longer want. ....... Use your phone/ipad to scan If you've got an iPhone or iPad, you have a couple of ways to scan your documents with your camera, but we'll be focusing on using the Files app. This method is preferred because the document is saved in Files, which makes it easy to then edit and share to your computer or other devices.1. To start, open the Files app. (Can't see the blue Files app icon on your Home Screen? Just swipe down, then search for the Files app. If you don't have it download from the app store.) 2. Next, tap the three-dot menu icon in the top-right. 3. Hit Scan Documents. Your camera will then open, and you'll be asked to position the document in view. The best way to scan your tax document is to place it on a flat surface, like a table or desk, in a well-lit area. Stay away from any surfaces that are white or reflect too much light, or else the camera won't be able to scan the document properly. Now, position the phone or tablet so that it's directly over the document and you'll see a blue overlay appear on the document, indicating it's being scanned. If the document is scanned correctly, it'll automatically be placed into your completed scans, allowing you to scan more documents if you wish. You can then tap the document preview in the bottom-left to rescan or edit your documents. You can crop them -- in case the automatic scanning wasn't great -- and add a filter (such as grayscale) to improve their readability. If you're happy with the scans, tap Save to store the document as a PDF in the Files app. You can then rename the document or share it via email. If you plan on filing taxes on your mobile device, you can also upload the PDF to any tax apps via the Files app.

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